An analysis of to the reader a poem by baudelaire

The beginning of this poem discusses the incessant dark vices of mankind which eclipse any attempt at true redemption. The ending stanza says the most dangerous of all actions is boredom. A religious aspect is introduced in lines 5 through 7 stating that although we repent and confess, our sins are obstinate and our repentance feeble because soon after we are back to our wicked ways. Many religions, such as Christianity and Islam, believe that there is a joyous afterlife for those who have led a righteous lifestyle and have atoned for their sins.

An analysis of to the reader a poem by baudelaire

He was about as twisted and disturbing as they come.

SparkNotes: The Flowers of Evil: Spleen and Ideal, Part I, page 2

It had been a while since I read this poem and as I opened my copy of The Flowers of Evil I remembered that the text has two translations of the poem, both good but different.

Our sins are mulish, our confessions lies; we play to the grandstand with our promises, we pray for tears to wash our filthiness; importantly pissing hogwash through our sties.

The devil, watching by our sickbeds, hissed old smut and folk-songs to our soul, until the soft and precious metal of our will boiled off in vapor for this scientist.

Each day his flattery makes us eat a toad, and each step forward is a step to hell, unmoved, through previous corpses and their smell asphyxiate our progress on this road. Like the poor lush who cannot satisfy, we try to force our sex with counterfeits, die drooling on the deliquescent tits, mouthing the rotten orange we suck dry.

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Gangs of demons are boozing in our brain — ranked, swarming, like a million warrior-ants, they drown and choke the cistern of our wants; each time we breathe, we tear our lungs with pain. If poison, arson, sex, narcotics, knives have not yet ruined us and stitched their quick, loud patterns on the canvas of our lives, it is because our souls are still too sick.

Tears have glued its eyes together. You know it well, my Reader. This obscene beast chain-smokes yawning for the guillotine — you — hypocrite Reader — my double — my brother! Baudelaire sees ennui as the root of all decadence and decay, and the structure of the poem reflects this idea.

Consider the title of the book: The Flowers of Evil. The visible blossoms are what break through the surface, but they stem from an evil root, which is boredom.

The middle stanzas are the stem, which feed and nourish our sickness. Finally, the closing stanzas are the root, the hidden part of ourselves from which all our vices originate. I find the closing line to be the most interesting.

Baudelaire essentially points his finger at us, his readers, in a very accusatory manner. He accuses us of being hypocrites, and I suspect this is because erudite readers would probably consider themselves above this vice and decadence.

But the truth is, many of us have turned to literature and drowned ourselves in books as a way to quench the boredom that wells within us, and while it is still a better way to deal with our ennui than drugs or sadism, it is still an escape.

An analysis of to the reader a poem by baudelaire

We all have the same evil root within us. I disagree, and I think Baudelaire would concur.

“to the Reader” Analysis - Essay Samples

Money just allows one to explore more elaborate forms of vice and sin as a way of dealing with boredom. You provide a bored person with unlimited funds and it is just a matter of time before that person discovers some creatively exquisite forms of decadence.The son of Joseph-Francois Baudelaire and Caroline Archimbaut Dufays, Charles Baudelaire was born in Paris on April 9, Baudelaire's father, who was thirty years older than his .

This piece was written by Baudelaire as a preface to the collection "Flowers of Evil." It is a forty line, pessimistic view of the condition of humanity, derived from the poet's own opinions of the causes and origins of said condition.

Throughout the poem, Baudelaire rebukes the reader for their. “To The Reader” Analysis The never-ending circle of continuous sin and fallacious repentance envelops the poem “To the Reader” by Baudelaire.

The beginning of this poem discusses the incessant dark vices of mankind . To The Reader” Analysis The never-ending circle of continuous sin and fallacious repentance envelops the poem “To the Reader” by Baudelaire. The beginning of this poem discusses the incessant dark vices of mankind which eclipse any attempt at true redemption.

As the poem progresses, the dreariness becomes heavier by mentioning . Aug 27,  · “To The Reader” by Charles Baudelaire When I first discovered Baudelaire, he immediately became my favorite poet.

He was about as twisted and disturbing as they come. To the Reader, By Charles Baudelaire.

To the Reader, By Charles Baudelaire. Tertullian, Swift, Jeremiah, Baudelaire are alike in this: they are severe and constant reprehenders of the human way. In their fashion, each has a notion of what goodness is; one has to have a notion of purity if one is to be assured of one's condemnation. Baudelaire in this poem states what the. A summary of Spleen and Ideal, Part I in Charles Baudelaire's The Flowers of Evil. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Flowers of Evil and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Discussion of themes and motifs in Charles Baudelaire's To the Reader. eNotes critical analyses help you gain a deeper understanding of To the Reader so you can excel on your essay or test.

Tertullian, Swift, Jeremiah, Baudelaire are alike in this: they are severe and constant reprehenders of the human way. In their fashion, each has a notion of what goodness is; one has to have a notion of purity if one is to be assured of one's condemnation.

“To the Reader” Analysis - Sample Essays